Windows 2000 Tips

Windows 2000 Tips

Welcome to the windows 2000 tips section of our website, scan down the page for the tips. One site we recommend you visit is windowsreinstall.com they have loads of Windows 2000 information and help, from beginner to expert, reinstall guides, install guides, upgrade guides and more.

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ICA Clients Over Dial-Up Link May Unexpectedly Disconnect

Terminal Services Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) clients may disconnect unexpectedly from a computer that is running Terminal Services over an ICA dial-up link. This problem is more likely to occur with computers that have multiple central processing units.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft.


Desktop Cycler

Desktop Cycler for Windows 98/95/NT/2000 is a special utility to manage and cycle your desktop goodies. Using easy to use interface you can cycle hundreds of selected wallpapers, screensavers, desktop themes, windows logo, IE's toolbar skins or even Start Menu icons automatically on specific time. Plus access hundreds of selected resources sites for great and free desktop goodies! Get it here.


A "Stop 0x0000001e, 0xC0000005, 0x00000009" Error Occurs in the Classpnp.sys Driver (Q311278)

A "Stop 0x0000001e, 0xC0000005, 0x00000009" error may occur in the Classpnp.sys driver on multiprocessor computers.
This error occurs because a linked list is being traversed while the list is locked. Therefore, the list can be modified while a thread is searching it.
A supported fix is now available from Microsoft, but it is only intended to correct the problem described in this article and should be applied only to systems experiencing this specific problem. This fix may receive additional testing at a later time, to further ensure product quality. Therefore, if you are not severely affected by this problem, Microsoft recommends that you wait for the next Windows 2000 service pack that contains this fix. To resolve this problem immediately, contact Microsoft Product Support Services to obtain the fix.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft.


Error Message: The Recycle Bin on C:\ Is Corrupt or Invalid. Do You Want to Empty the Recycle Bin for this... (Q297760)

When you perform delete operations on files or folders, you may receive the following error message:
The Recycle Bin on drive letter :\ is corrupt or invalid. Do you want to empty the Recycle Bin for this drive?
This problem is more likely to occur if your computer has drive letters that have been created by using the Subst.exe tool.
This problem can occur when the logical drive that is referenced is an NTFS drive and there was an error in a permissions-compare operation.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft


Computer Stops Responding During Windows 2000 DNS Query (Q311309)

During DNS name resolution on your client computer, your computer may stop responding (hang), and this may happen in multiple processes including services.
This problem can occur if a NULL pointer is returned that was dereferenced.
A supported fix is now available from Microsoft, but it is only intended to correct the problem described in this article and should be applied only to systems experiencing this specific problem. This fix may receive additional testing at a later time, to further ensure product quality. Therefore, if you are not severely affected by this problem, Microsoft recommends that you wait for the next Windows 2000 service pack that contains this fix. To resolve this problem immediately, contact Microsoft Product Support Services to obtain the fix.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft


How to Show All Items on the Start Menu or Favorites Menu (Q230596)

Personalized Menus organizes the Start menu ( Programs and Favorites ) or the Microsoft Internet Explorer Favorites menu to reflect how you use these menus. When Personalized Menus is turned on, Windows keeps track of which items you access from the Start menu or the Internet Explorer Favorites menu, hiding the items you have not accessed recently while keeping all of your items easily accessible. Personalized Menus is turned on by default. This article describes how to show all items on the Start menu or the Internet Explorer Favorites menu, or turn this feature off so you always see all the menu items.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft


PMTU Detection May Not Work After You Install Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 (Q301337)

After you install Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 (SP2) on one of your servers, clients may not be able to use that server for different programs, such as Terminal Services, File and Printer sharing, or Microsoft Exchange Server.
Client computers that experience these problems are typically running Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98 or Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me) and are connecting to your network by using Virtual Private Networking (VPN), but may also include Windows 2000 or Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 clients depending upon your network configuration.
If you are using non-Microsoft VPN servers or any routers that are using Network Address Translation (NAT), you may also see these symptoms from client computers.
Your Windows 98 client may receive the following error message when you try to copy files to or from a file share on the remote Windows 2000 server:
Cannot copy file name the specified network resource or device is no longer available.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft


How to Receive Verbose Startup, Shutdown, Logon, and Logoff Status Messages (Q316243)

This article describes how to configure Windows so that you receive verbose startup, shutdown, logon, and logoff status messages. In scenarios where you are troubleshooting slow startup, shutdown, logon, or logoff behavior, you may find it helpful to enable verbose logging.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft


Qchain.exe

Microsoft has released a command-line tool named QChain.exe that gives system administrators the ability to safely chain hotfixes together. Hotfix chaining involves installing multiple hotfixes without rebooting between each installation. Without this tool, the only supported method is to reboot after each hotfix installation. The QChain.exe tool has the following benefits:
It increases uptime for servers because computers are not being rebooted between each hotfix installation.
It allows faster installations of multiple hotfixes on a single computer.
It is a solution that works on both Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0.
NOTE : The QChain.exe tool is not required on Windows XP and later. The hotfix installer in Windows XP includes functionality to support multiple hotfix installation.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft with links and explanation of the tool.


Flaw in Win2000, NT4.0 makes domains 'too trusting'

A flaw in the way Microsoft Corp.'s Windows 2000 and NT 4.0 server operating systems authenticate users across domains could allow somebody with administrator privileges to extend that power to other domains, Microsoft warned Wednesday.
Although the flaw is "extremely difficult" to exploit, the worst case scenario associated with it is "serious," Microsoft said in a security bulletin. Administrators are encouraged to consider installing a software fix, if physical and personnel security considerations indicate sufficient risk, the software maker said.
The flaw lies in the trust relationships between network domains in Windows 2000 and NT 4.0 environments. The trusting domain does not verify that the trusted domain is actually authoritative for all the SIDs (security identifiers) in the authorization data, allowing an attacker to increase his or her access level, Microsoft said.
Click here for more.


Addressing DoS Vulnerabilities

Last month, (December, 2001) Microsoft published an article that documents five registry modifications you can use to reduce Windows 2000's TCP vulnerability to a variety of Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. These guidelines are appropriate for Win2K systems connected to a WAN or to the Internet and for sites that operate under strict security controls.
Because the techniques are sophisticated and require that you modify several core TCP algorithms, I recommend that you experiment with a system in a lab setting before applying any changes to production systems. Incorrect or inappropriate settings can adversely affect nearly all Win2K services and applications. To ensure that systems you modify operate successfully in a production environment, you should connect your test system to multiple subnets, preferably with one or two routers. Today, I describe two modifications—one that hardens a system against a common DoS SYN attack and one that prevents dead-gateway exploits. Read the full article in detail with great explanations and direction on which settings you could use here.For information about these and other modifications you can make, see Microsoft article Q315669.


Multibooting with Windows 2000 and Windows XP

Some good info from Microsoft. A computer can be configured to let you choose between two or more operating systems each time you restart the computer. For example, you could set up a server to run Windows 2000 Server most of the time but allow it to sometimes run Windows NT Server 4.0 in order to support an older application. With multibooting, you can choose which operating system to run or specify a default OS if no selection is made during the restart process.
Before using the multibooting feature, consider the tradeoffs: each operating system uses valuable disk space, and file system compatibility can be complex if you want to run Windows 2000 on one partition and Windows NT Server 4.0 or an earlier OS on another partition. In addition, dynamic disk format introduced in Windows 2000 does not work with earlier operating systems. However, multibooting capabilities are a valuable feature providing the single-machine flexibility not only to run earlier operating systems but also experience the advances in the next version of the operating system, named Windows XP for the client version and currently codenamed "Whistler" Server for the server version. Click here for the whole article.


How to Enable Automatic Logon in Windows 2000 (Q234562)

This is an article from Microsofts website, located here.
To prevent the password prompt in a non-domain system:
  1. In Control Panel , double-click Users and Passwords .
  2. Click to clear the Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer check box .
    NOTE: This option does not appear on a system that is a member of a domain.
  3. Click the Advanced tab.
  4. Click to clear the Require users to press Ctrl-Alt-Del before logging on check box.
Automatic logon is not supported when you are logging on to a domain. You will need to join a workgroup if you want the automatic logon feature.
This can also be turned on in a Windows 2000 Professional domain system by editing the registry.
WARNING: This procedure will allow the user to log on automatically to the domain. This could cause a serious security problem. Anyone booting this system with this registry modification will be logged on to the system with the user's security credentials.
  1. Start Regedt32.exe and locate the following registry key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon
  2. Establish your domain name, account name, and password, using the values you would normally type when logging on. You should assign the following values: DefaultDomainName, DefaultUserName, and DefaultPassword.
    NOTE: The DefaultDomainName and DefaultUserName values may already exist. The DefaultPassword value may not. If it does not, create it:
    • On the Edit menu, click Add Value .
    • In the Value Name box, type DefaultPassword .
    • In the Data Type box, click REG_SZ .
    • Click OK .
    • In the String Editor box, type your password. Click OK and save your changes.
    NOTE : If no DefaultPassword string is specified, Windows automatically changes the value of the AutoAdminLogon key from 1 (true) to 0 (false). This disables the AutoAdminLogon feature.
  3. On the Edit menu, click Add Value . Type AutoAdminLogon in the Value Name box. Click REG_SZ in the Data Type box. Enter 1 in the String box. Save your changes.
  4. Quit Regedt32.exe.
  5. Shut down Windows and turn off the computer.
  6. Restart your computer and Windows 2000. You should be able to log on automatically now.
NOTE: To bypass the AutoAdminLogon process and log on on as a different user, hold down the SHIFT key after a logoff or after a Windows restart.


TCP/IP and NBT Configuration Parameters for Windows 2000 or Windows NT

The TCP/IP protocol suite implementation for Windows NT 3.5x and 4.0 reads all of its configuration data from the registry. This information is written to the registry by the Network tool in Control Panel as part of the Setup process. Some of this information is also supplied by the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client service if it is enabled.
This reference defines all of the registry parameters used to configure the protocol driver, Tcpip.sys, which implements the standard TCP/IP network protocols.
The implementation of the protocol suite should perform properly and efficiently in most environments using only the configuration information gathered by the Network tool in Control Panel and DHCP. Optimal default values for all other configurable aspects of the protocols have been encoded into the drivers.
Click here for more.

Windows 2000 security fixes released

Microsoft on Wednesday issued an important collection of security fixes for Windows 2000. The release of the 17MB downloadable Windows 2000 Security Rollup Package (SRP1) comes as Microsoft steps up its emphasis on security. In an e-mail to Microsoft's 47,000 employees earlier this month, Chairman Bill Gates called for putting security ahead of adding new features to products.
Among the fixes: several denial-of-service and buffer-overflow patches, telnet and file-transfer protocol tweaks and authentication-error repairs, among others.
SRP1 is a cumulative collection of security fixes released since Microsoft issued Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 in May. Service packs are collections of fixes and enhancements periodically released for Windows. Service Pack 3 for Windows 2000 is currently in beta testing.
Click here for more.

Removing applications from Add/Remove Programs

On occasion, you'll find that an application listed in Add/Remove Programs even after you've uninstalled it from your computer. You can remove such applications from Add/Remove Programs by editing your computer's registry. Begin by running Registry Editor and accessing the key
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionUninstall
You'll find keys listed below the Uninstall key that correspond to the applications you see listed in Add/Remove Programs. You remove an application from this list by selecting its key in Registry Editor and then deleting it.


7 Steps to prepare your PC to for Windows 2000

One Ensure that your hardware meets Windows 2000 system requirments. Microsoft provides an updated Windows 2000 minimum-hardware-requirment list.

Two Make sure you obtain updates for your hardware, firmware and device drivers to make sure your system is ready for Windows 2000. Microsft's Windows 2000 Hardware Update site, http://hardware-update.com, contains drivers that third-party vendors updated or released after Microsoft shipped Windows 2000. All drivers have passed Windows Hardware Quality Labs certification process. Ensuring that your system has the latest BIOS version is essential to a successful Windows 2000 upgrade. An outdated BIOS version is a cause for trouble on most systems.

Three Make sure that your hardware and software are Windows 2000 compatible, run winnt32 with the /checkupgradeonly switch on the target system, when you use this option, it launches in a mode that doesn't install Windows 2000 but checks your system for potential upgrade problems. Setup then generates a report that details the results of the inspection. For NT 4.0 or 3.5 upgrades, it saves the report to a winnt32.log file in the installation folder, for Windows 9.x upgrades, it saves the report in an upgrade.txt file in the Windows installation folder.

Four Visit Microsoft's Windows 2000 upgrade web site, for additional installation and compatibility information, a system-preperation checklist for each OS that you can upgrade, and other important information and tools.

Five Run a thorough virus scan making sure to have the latest virus definitions loaded. Boot sector viruses are not a good thing to find when upgrading your OS.

Six Uninstall all power-management and disk management tools, these can cause problems during installation. Setup will check for these, but, as you know, no software is perfect.

Seven Perform a full system backup, don't risk it, don't forget, just do it. Better safe than sorry.


RC2 Win2k USB 2.0 drivers leak

Microsoft produced Release Candidate 2 of the USB 2.0 drivers for Windows 2000 late on Friday, and they promptly leaked to littlewhitedog.com and Digital Silence. There is as yet no word on when finished drivers will be available, although finished WinXP drivers themselves leaked two weeks ago, and are also downloadable via Intel, and Microsoft's hotfix FTP site.
The release of the RC2 drivers ends almost three months of famine for Windows 2000 USB 2.0 owners. Microsoft thoughtfully expired the RC1 drivers when Windows XP was released in October, although it left the expired drivers up on Windows Update until December, so people could download them and not be able to use them.
The lateness of Win2k drivers is, in the view of Jeff Roberts of USBman, suspicious. During most of the beta process new USB 2.0 driver releases from Microsoft contained both XP and Win2k code, but while it appears the WinXP drivers were finished in November, the brakes have been mysteriously slammed on the Win2k ones. Is Microsoft trying to tell Win2k users something?
Click here for more.


Start the DOS Command Prompt with a Click

By installing this free Power Toy from Microsoft, you can open a DOS command prompt from any folder with a mouse click. With the proper commands, this allows you to perform a variety of power tasks, such as an instant memory check of your machine. You can even right-click the tiny icon in the upper left corner of an open folder for the DOS command prompt. Microsoft Technical Support does not support the Power Toys.
To use the Command Prompt Here:
  1. Create a folder by right clicking on the desktop, clicking New, and then clicking Folder. Type a name for the folder.
  2. Browse to the nt download page and scroll down to the Command Prompt Here 1.1 link beneath the Power Toys heading.
  3. Click the Download Now button on the Command Prompt Here page. In the File download dialog box that appears on your screen, click Save Program to Disk.
  4. In the Save As dialog box, choose to save the file in the folder you just created, and then click Save.
  5. Open the folder and double-click the downloaded file. This may create several new files in your folder. Among these, look for "Read Me" or "INF" files.
  6. The "Read Me" file will contain any additional download information you need to know. To install the file, right click the .INF file and click Install.


Move Portions of Your Start Menu

You can make shortcuts on the taskbar that bring up frequently used items from your Start menu. This is also helpful if you want easy access to Start menu items on a different part of the screen.
  1. Right click on an empty section of the taskbar point to Toolbars and then click New Toolbar...
  2. In the New Toolbar window, browse to your Start menu directory (c:\documents and settings\USERNAME\Start Menu\Programs\). Choose the folder you want. Click on OK.
  3. Rearrange your taskbar by dragging on the vertical bars until only the folder title is showing. All the actual links will disappear into a double arrow.
  4. Click the double arrow to bring up the menu. You can drag the menu to another edge of the display to act as a second Start menu. For long titles, you might want to rename them to something shorter before you create the shortcut.


Desktop Shortcut to Device Manager

For those who find themselves frequently swapping and replacing their computer’s internal hardware, creating an easy desktop shortcut to Device Manager saves several steps over the route through Control Panel.
To create a shortcut to Device Manager:
  1. Right-click anywhere in your desktop.
  2. Point to New, and then click Shortcut.
  3. In the Create Shortcut wizard, type c:\winnt\system32\mmc.exe c:\winnt\system32\devmgmt.msc in the location of the item box (c:\winnt is the default system directory).
  4. Click Next.
  5. Enter a name for the shortcut, and then click Finish.
You can also use this procedure to create a desktop shortcut to Computer Management, a utility that includes Device Manager as well as Event Viewer, System Information, Performance Logs and Alerts, and other useful management tools. To do this, just replace devmgmt.msc with compmgmt.msc.


What About Administration Tools?

If you’re looking for administration tools folder on your Microsoft Windows® 2000 Professional computer, you'll find it in Control Panel. Through customer feedback, the Administrative Tools folder was moved to Control Panel, where the majority of operating-system configuration and management tools are located.
However, if you miss having the Administrative Tools folder on the Start Menu, you can easily move it back to the Start Menu:
To move the Administrative Tools folder to your Start menu:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, then click Taskbar & Start Menu.
  2. Click the Advanced tab.
  3. In the list of Start Menu Settings, ensure that the Display Administrative Tools check box is selected, then click OK.


WinXP USB 2.0 driver slides out, Win2k version MIA?

The Windows XP USB 2.0 driver that leaked last week does seem to be the finished item, and it's also available for download from Intel and Microsoft - in the latter case, only sort of. But for some strange reason, the Windows 2000 implementation seems to have gone missing.
Jeff Roberts of USBMan tells us that Win2k USB 2.0 drivers were in beta at the same time as the WinXP ones, but that his last three emails enquiring as to their whereabouts have gone unanswered. Microsoft is still committed to shipping USB 2.0 drivers for Win2k (earlier OSes won't be supported), but hasn't said when. Jeff does however note that there are no plans to include them in Win2k Service Pack 3, which is currently in beta.
Click here for more.


More W2K Service Pack 3 Detail

SP3 is in beta testing right now and it is expected that at least one more "build" or update to the SP3 beta will be released. (there has only been a single version released to the technical beta testers so far, and that was in December). It looks clear that there will be another version sometime soon, and that MS is planning at least one more chat session with SP3 testers.
Since the initial SP3 beta release several security patches have been released, and a roll-up security fix for W2K was recently released to the beta Windows Update site before being pulled abruptly because of problems reported with it. I would expect that "roll-up" fix to go into SP3 and in fact maybe that's the delay right now. SP3 could be soon but it may take a month or so.


Where's MSINFO?

For frequent users of the utility MSINFO, you can now find it in the Computer Management console.
To open and use MSINFO:
  1. Right-click the My Computer icon.
  2. To open the Computer Management console, select Manage.
  3. In the list of items under System Tools, expand the items under System Information, and you’ll recognize the sections you’re accustomed to seeing.
As before, you can export these details as a System Information File, which can be sent to Microsoft support professionals who request it. You can also open or print a System Information file.


Use Device Manager to Switch from Uniprocessor to Multiprocessor Support

You can easily go from uniprocessor (UP) to multiprocessor (MP) support in Windows 2000 by using the Device Manager.
Here's how to do this in Windows 2000:
  1. In Control Panel, open System, choose the Hardware tab, then click the Device Manager button.
  2. Select the Computer node and expand it.
  3. Double-click the first object listed below the computer node—on some systems, it is called "Standard PC". It might have a different name on your particular system.
  4. Choose the Driver tab, and then click the Update Driver button.
  5. On the Upgrade Device Driver Wizard, click the Next button, then select "Display a known list of drivers for this device so that I can choose a specific driver." Click the Next button.
  6. On the Select Device Driver page, select "Show all hardware of this device class."
  7. Select the HAL that matches your new configuration, multiprocessor or uniprocessor. Click the Next button. Check that the wizard is showing the configuration you want.
  8. To install the driver, click the Next button.
  9. To complete the wizard, click the Finish button.
Note: To switch from uniprocessor (UP) to multiprocessor (MP) support in Windows NT 4.0, use a Resource Kit utility called uptomp, or reinstall the operating system.


Opening a Command Prompt from Windows Explorer

With previous versions of Microsoft Windows NT, to open a command prompt, the Cmd.exe command was always associated with Windows Explorer folders. The old technique was to go to the Windows NT Explorer Options/File Types and associate the File Folder item with Cmd.exe. With Windows 2000, you can use the Registry to activate this feature.
To enable the command prompt feature:
  • Create a new text file and call it "command.reg" (select any appropriate name for the .reg file).
  • Right-click the file and select Edit.
  • Copy and paste the following code into the file. Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\Command] @="Command &Prompt" [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\Command\command] @="cmd.exe \\\"%1\\\""
  • Save and close the file.
  • To merge the file into the registry, right-click the file and select Merge.
  • When prompted to confirm your intended actions, click Yes.
  • When informed that your actions were successful, click OK.
To confirm your actions:
  1. Right-click on a folder.
  2. Confirm that an item labelled Command displays.
  3. Select that item which will open a command prompt in that particular directory.



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Activate Network Monitor icon

Since the Network Monitor icon is not always activated by default, you may want to activate it yourself.
To activate the icon and its indicator "lights":
  1. On the desktop, right-click My Network Places, then choose Properties.
  2. In the Network and Dial-up Connections window, double-click Local Area Connection. On some computers, Local Area Connection (LAN) may be listed as Wide Area Network (WAN).
  3. Click Properties. Select the "Show icon in taskbar when connected" check box at the bottom. Click OK.
An icon will display on your taskbar with a set of lights that show network activity. It's a great way to tell if your network is transferring any data.
Bonus Tip
To display a pop-up window that provides data on the current status of your connection—including speed and packets sent and received—place the cursor over the Network Monitor icon. To display a full Status window or to disconnect the network connection, double-click the icon.

Quick E-mail

If you want to send a quick e-mail, perform one of the following steps:
  • Type mailto: in the Run: box (found in the Start menu).
  • Type mailto: in the Address: box of Internet Explorer.
  • Create a shortcut (for starting a new mail message) by typing mailto: in the Location text box of the Create Shortcut wizard.
You'll save yourself a few steps by not going into your default e-mail application and starting a new mail message.

Immediate Queries with Indexing Service

By default, Indexing Service only indexes when applications and peripherals are not in use. If you type or move the mouse, indexing ceases for a couple of minutes. Also, if there are changes on the disk, Indexing Service won't index them for up to five minutes. This can be frustrating if you want to immediately query for files you just changed. To update as soon as possible:
  1. In the Indexing Service MMC, right click Indexing Service, and then click Stop the service.
  2. Right click Indexing Service, and then select All Tasks/Tune Performance.
  3. Click the Customize radio button, and then click the Customize button.
  4. Click and drag Indexing over to Instant.
  5. Press OK twice.
  6. Right click Indexing Service, and then click Start.
Now your changed files will be indexed in a few seconds or less.

Control the Eject Function and More from Your Taskbar

If you have a computer tower case that rests on the floor, it may be bothersome to reach down and push the Eject button on your CD-ROM drive. Windows 2000 Professional allows you to play, pause, stop, and eject CDs from the taskbar. By right clicking the CD Player icon, you can also select any track, jump to the previous or next track, and create and edit play lists.
To add this capability to your taskbar:
  1. On the Start menu, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to Entertainment, and then click CD Player.
  2. On the Options menu in CD Player, click Preferences.
  3. In the Preferences dialog box, on the Player Options tab, click the Show control on task bar check box.
  4. Click OK.

Folder Shortcuts

Folder shortcuts are a new feature of the Windows 2000 shell, allowing you to make any folder on the user's machine act as if it were another folder. Unlike traditional shortcuts, Folder shortcuts integrate the target into the shell namespace, allowing you to present a direct hierarchy.
For example, if you drag and drop an icon for a folder or disk drive to your Start menu, Windows 2000 creates a shortcut that cascades to expose the contents of the target of the shortcut.
To create a folder shortcut:
  1. Drag and drop a folder or disk drive icon onto your Start menu.
  2. Click the Start menu, then point to the folder or drive that you just moved.
The target of the folder or drive shortcut has been grafted into the shell namespace. This reduces user confusion, because the Up button actually goes back up to the folder that contained the folder shortcut.
Note: If you open an Explorer window on the Start menu, you will see that the tree view expands through the folder shortcut.

Folder Shortcuts on a Network

One useful way of exploiting a folder shortcut is to install it onto your Start menu, targeting a network share under the control of a system administrator. The administrator could then update the files on that share, and the changes are automatically reflected on the Start menu.
If you combine this feature with the ability to customize the icon and ToolTip for subfolders, you can deploy a customized, centrally controlled Start menu to all your users.

More Details in My Documents and Windows Explorer

View Mode
When scanning your folder contents in Windows Explorer, if you set the view mode to Details, you can usually view such default details as:
  • Name
  • Size
  • Type
  • Modified
If you’re interested in seeing additional file information in Windows Explorer when your files are set to Details mode, right-click on one of the column titles in Windows Explorer and you can add columns that display such fields as:
  • Attributes
  • Comment
  • Author
If you select the More... option at the bottom, a dialog box displays with additional fields that you can select.
Comment Column
With Windows Explorer set to Details view, if you open the file properties of certain file types such as Word documents or Excel spreadsheets, you can add explanatory text or comments to the Comment column.
To add comments to a file that you can view in Windows Explorer:
  1. Right-click the file name and open the Properties dialog box.
  2. Select the Summary tab.
  3. Select the Comments icon and type your comments in the text box.
  4. When finished, click OK.
You can also use a Customize This Folder wizard to enable a folder to display information in the Comment column.
To enable a folder to display information in the Comment column:
  1. Open Windows Explorer and select a folder for which you want to add comments.
  2. To launch the wizard, from the View menu, select Customize This Folder.
  3. When the Welcome to the Customize This Folder Wizard window displays, click Next.
  4. Select the Add Folder Comment check box. Clear all remaining check boxes, and then click Next.
  5. In the Folder comment: text box, enter your comments. When completed, click Next.
  6. To complete the wizard and have your changes take effect, click Finish.

Removing and Personalizing Desktop Icons

Quick Launch
If you want to streamline your desktop and frequently used applications, simply drag a desktop icon to the Quick Launch portion of the taskbar. The re-located icon appears next to the other Quick Launch icons (e.g., Internet Explorer, Outlook Express).
To remove the icon that still remains on the desktop, locate the icon again and drag it to the recycle bin. With this icon removed from the desktop, it’ll be one less desktop icon to hunt for when you need to start a commonly used program.
My Computer icon
If you need to access My Computer on a regular basis, drag the My Computer icon to the Start button, and you will automatically create a cascading shortcut to My Computer that will expand to reveal your drives, folders, and files. With Windows 2000 incorporating the use of tooltips, you can also hold your cursor over a partition in the Start Menu for a moment to view its free space and capacity. You can execute a file just by single clicking on it in the Start Menu, and open a folder by double clicking.

Use Network Connection Wizard to Transfer Data

If you need to transfer data between two computers that are running Windows 2000 Professional, the direct-connection method is very easy to set up. You can set up a parallel port connection in just a couple of minutes, then move files and folders to a new machine without a hitch.
To set up a parallel port connection between two computers:
  1. In Control Panel, open the Networking and Dial-up Connections folder.
  2. Double-click Make New Connection to start the Network Connection Wizard, then click Next.
  3. On the Network Connection Type page, click Connect directly to another computer, then click Next.
  4. In the Host or Guest page, specify the role of your computer:
    • Host: This computer has the information you want to access.
    • Guest: This computer will be used to access information on the host computer.
  5. In the Connection Device page, identify the appropriate connection device (from one of the following items in the drop-down list), then click Next:
    • Infrared
    • Serial
    • Parallel port
  6. In the Allowed Users page, select who may use the connection, then click Next.
  7. In the Completing the Network Connection page, the default name for the enter a name for the connection, then click Finish.

Windows 2000 Service Pack 2

Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 (SP2) provides the latest updates to the Windows 2000 family of operating systems. These updates are a collection of fixes in the following areas: application compatibility, operating system reliability, security, and setup. Windows 2000 SP2 includes the updates contained in Windows 2000 Service Pack 1 (SP1). Windows 2000 SP2 is not considered a required upgrade. To determine whether to install Windows 2000 SP2, Microsoft recommends that customers review the Windows 2000 SP2 documentation found under Learn More.
Windows 2000 SP2 automatically upgrades your system to 128-bit encryption. It is not possible to disable or uninstall this feature. If you remove Windows 2000 SP2 after installation, your system will continue to use 128-bit encryption; it will not revert to back to 56-bit encryption.
Windows 2000 SP2 adds high encryption support for all Windows 2000 encryption-based services, including Kerberos, Encrypting File System, RAS, RPC, SSL/TLS, CryptoAPI, Terminal Services RDP, and IPSec. High encryption support improves the security of local data and online transactions, as well as any other content you share over networks or the Internet. Get it and more info here.

Windows 2000 drivers

Need to reinstall Windows 2000, or want to upgrade your current windows 2000 drivers? The first two places I would check for windows 2000 drivers would be driverhq.com, which has a comprehensive driver listing from audio to video, and they also have a program called Driver detective, which will help you find your current driver verion and manufacturer, and driverguide.com, which was created to make finding driver updates a whole lot easier. With the help of thousands of our members, we have compiled a massive database of drivers and resources that is by far the largest and most comprehensive on the Web.

New and improved DUN, in Windows 2000

Microsoft has added some things to windows 2000 Dial Up Networking. From the first page of the DUN properties you can click on an alternates button. This window allows you to put in alternate numbers to try, you can also specify that the successful number will be moved to the top of the list. Helpful when fighting busy signals with your ISP . A second button on the DUN window allows you to set up dialing rules, for 10-digit dialing or for using a calling card. This can be set at the specific DUN level, which is nice for laptops and traveling! The network tab allows you to set network protocols at the DUN level too, with a lot more granularity than previously allowed, also good for traveling, or for setting up the dial in for the RAS server at work. And for the security conscious, you can enable or disable file and print sharing at the DUN level also.

Use System File Checker to Solve Problems

I have found that many problems with Windows 2000 can be solved using the utility "sfc" with the Command Prompt. Sometimes, in the course of installing a program in Windows 2000, the program will overwrite or modify Win 2000's system files i.e. ".dll's" with their own version. If Windows 2000 misbehaves after a program installation, read the following and run "sfc" with the Command Prompt.
System File Checker (sfc.exe) is a command line utility that scans and verifies the versions of all protected system files after you restart your computer. If System File Checker discovers that a protected file has been overwritten, it retrieves the correct version of the file from the %systemroot%\system32\dllcache folder, and then replaces the incorrect file.
Syntax:
sfc [/scannow] [/scanonce] [/scanboot] [/cancel] [/quiet] [/enable] [/purgecache] [/cachesize=x]
Parameters:
/scannow
Scans all protected system files immediately.
/scanonce
Scans all protected system files once.
/scanboot
Scans all protected system files every time the computer is restarted.
/cancel
Cancels all pending scans of protected system files.
/quiet
Replaces all incorrect file versions without prompting the user.
/enable
Returns Windows File Protection to default operation, prompting the user to restore protected system files when files with incorrect versions are detected.
/purgecache
Purges the Windows File Protection file cache and scans all protected system files immediately.
/cachesize=x
Sets the size, in MB, of the Windows File Protection file cache.
You must be logged on as an administrator or as a member of the Administrators group to run System File Checker. If the %systemroot%\system32\dllcache folder becomes corrupt or unusable, use Sfc /scannow, Sfc /scanonce, or Sfc /scanboot to repair the contents of the Dllcache directory.

Application Compatibility tool

If you are trying to run a program and it won't run because it states you are using the wrong OS try using the Application Compatibility tool. It is located in the support folder on your Win2000 CD.
"The Application Compatibility tool (Apcompat.exe) is a tool that attempts to convince programs that perform compliance checking in Windows 2000 that they are actually running under an earlier operating system."

Thorough Scandisk in Windows 2000

The easy way is to open the Run box and type "chkdsk (drive:)/f" and you'll be asked if you would like to run it during the next startup. Say yes and reboot. If you do this without the "/f" parameter it will check your disk on the spot but won't fix anything. Good for information purposes.
The GUI way to do it is as follows...
Right-click on your drive, select Properties, Tools tab, Check Now button. Check both of the boxes and click Ok. You'll get a message saying it cannot perform the check as it cannot obtain exclusive access to the drive. It will then ask if you would like to run this during the next startup. Say Yes. Now reboot and Windows 2000 will do a multi-stage check on your drive.

Windows 2000 Web services

Frustrated with the Personal Web Server that comes with Front Page and Windows 98? Windows 2000 comes bundled with a full-featured web server -IIS 5.0. You can run a personal or small business intranet with it, and yes, it comes with Front Page Extensions, so you can use those cool toys at home. IIS also has a built in FTP server, SMTP (mail) server and NNTP (news) server. IIS 5.0 is installed on Windows 2000 server by default. You can add, remove or install additional components from the Control Panel-add/remove programs icon.
IIS 5.0 is not installed on Windows 2000 Professional by default. Go to Add/Remove Programs, Add/Remove Windows Components, Mark the box, IIS.
To manage your web server, use the Internet Information Services console found at:
Start
Programs
Administrative tools
Internet Services Manager

Shut down does not turn off computer

If the APM mode is enabled go to the device manager and from the view menu select "show hidden devices". NT APM/legacy support should appear. Just enable it and hopefully your problem will be solved.

Windows 2000 Security

Windows 2000 strives to improve security policies over the previous versions, to make this process less of a headache for System Administrators, Windows 2000 offers a number of prebuilt and basic templates in the form of inf files that offer varying forms of security setting policies. All one has to do is browse to the Local Security Policy in Administrative Tools, then highlight Security settings and choose import policy. In most cases these templates will cover your needs, if not you can always customize them to your specific organization.

Windows 2000 now offers one stop networking

Being an operating system designed for networks, all your network connections are now accessible from the start menu (start, settings, network and dial up connections). Clicking on any of the listed connections will give you a status window on the connection, which includes uptime/connect time and the speed of the connection. From this window you can disable the connection (or hang up a dial in connection), and also, click on the properties button to view/change the connection properties. Another cool thing, Windows has finally grown up in the world of networking and changing a network setting does not require a reboot any more.

What About Administration Tools?

If you’re looking for administration tools folder on your Microsoft Windows® 2000 Professional computer, you'll find it in Control Panel. Through customer feedback, the Administrative Tools folder was moved to Control Panel, where the majority of operating-system configuration and management tools are located.
However, if you miss having the Administrative Tools folder on the Start Menu, you can easily move it back to the Start Menu, To move the Administrative Tools folder to your Start menu:
  1. Click Start, point to Settings, then click Taskbar & Start Menu.
  2. Click the Advanced tab.
  3. In the list of Start Menu Settings, ensure that the Display Administrative Tools check box is selected, then click OK.

Slow Network Browsing?

Windows 2000 has a problem where when you browse network drives, it would search the scheduled tasks folder, thus slowing down the response when browsing your network drives. Deleting a key from your registry will speed up network access, but, as always, be sure to back up your registry before making any changes.
  • Open up regedit.
  • Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/Software/Microsoft/Windows/Current Version/Explorer/RemoteComputer/NameSpace.
  • Find the key named {D6277990-4C6A-11CF-8D87-00AA0060F5BF}.
  • Right click on it and select delete, ok to confirm.
  • Restart your machine to allow the change to take affect.
Enjoy the improved response from your network drives.

Want to speed up the start menu?

This involves editing your registry, please back it up before modifying.
  • Open regedit.
  • Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop
  • Select MenuShowDelay from the list on the right.
  • Right click on it and select Modify.
  • Change the value to 0.
  • Reboot your computer your computer to allow the change to take affect.
The start menu should be blazing fast and display almost immediately.

Use Device Manager to Switch from Uniprocessor to Multiprocessor Support in Windows 2000

You can easily go from uniprocessor (UP) to multiprocessor (MP) support in Windows 2000 by using the Device Manager.
Here's how to do this in Windows 2000:
  1. In Control Panel, open System, choose the Hardware tab, then click the Device Manager button.
  2. Select the Computer node and expand it.
  3. Double-click the first object listed below the computer node—on some systems, it is called "Standard PC". It might have a different name on your particular system.
  4. Choose the Driver tab, and then click the Update Driver button.
  5. On the Upgrade Device Driver Wizard, click the Next button, then select "Display a known list of drivers for this device so that I can choose a specific driver." Click the Next button.
  6. On the Select Device Driver page, select "Show all hardware of this device class."
  7. Select the HAL that matches your new configuration, multiprocessor or uniprocessor. Click the Next button. Check that the wizard is showing the configuration you want.
  8. To install the driver, click the Next button.
  9. To complete the wizard, click the Finish button.

Description of Safe Boot Mode in Windows 2000 (Q202485)

To use a Safe Boot option, follow these steps:
  1. Restart your computer, and when the Boot menu appears, press F8 .
  2. When the Windows Advanced Options menu appears, select an option, and then press ENTER.
  3. When the Boot menu appears again, with the words "Safe Mode" displayed in red at the bottom, select the installation you want to start, and then press ENTER.
WARNING : Do not select a Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 installation.
Click here for the kb article from Microsoft

Coming soon, more blue screen of death errors, or bsod, also windows protection errors, your program has performed an illegal operation and more computer help, so check back to windows 2000 tips often.