Posts Tagged ‘RIAA’

RIAA In the News

The popular gadget site Gizmodo has declared March Boycott the RIAA month, saying the very reasons people download music is because of things like the RIAA and DRM. These things keep people from being able to play the music they buy on whatever device they choose to, you have to have an iPod to play tunes from iTunes, a Zune to play music from the Zune Marketplace, etc, and they are right, this is a bunch of crap. Used to be, when you bought your music tapes you could record them on other devices, listen to them however you want but nowadays, that is not the case when you buy music online. If I buy a song from a musician, I should be able to play it wherever I like on whatever device I have, but DRM prevents that, and causes people to download unprotected music online.

Beyond the harassment, extortion, and privacy invasion that the RIAA commits under the guise of lawsuits, they also stifle innovation by treating any open Internet source as a potential way for people to violate their copyrights. Recently, they filed a “motion for reconsideration” in a suit claiming that anything downloaded via an Internet connection is the responsibility of the owner of said connection. While the RIAA is trying to make it easier for them to get money out of the parents of kids they sue, the precedent that it would set would make it difficult, if not impossible, for open WiFi hotspots to exist. That means that the RIAA would make it impossible for you to connect to the web for free while out in a city that provides Internet access merely because you might use it to download music.

In effect, the RIAA’s insistence on strict DRM takes value away from legally purchased music. People have a choice: they can either pirate unrestricted MP3 files that will let them use them however they’d like, or they can pay for files that won’t allow them the freedom to listen where and how they choose. It only makes sense that many tech-savvy people choose to download MP3s rather than pay for crippled files. The RIAA wants people to pay for restrictions and like it. Source: Gizmodo’s Anti-RIAA Manifesto

This is exactly true, Steve Jobs recently called for digital media companies to get rid of the DRM, but that is an easy thing to do when you have nothing to loose, what he should’ve done would be to demand that they drop DRM and let people play their music anywhere, they way it is supposed to be.

In other RIAA news, apparently they don’t like a new bill submitted by Rick Boucher, a Virginia Democrat, and John Doolittle, a California Republican, that would allow consumers to circumvent digital copy restrictions in six limited areas when the copyright owners’ business models are not threatened. This so-called fair use doctrine would allow customers of copyright works to make a limited number of copies, either for reviews, news reporting, teaching and research. The RIAA said this would legalize “hacking”, something else they don’t sound too bright on, look it up fellas.

“The fair use doctrine is threatened today as never before,” Boucher said in a statement. “Historically, the nation’s copyright laws have reflected a carefully calibrated balanced between the rights of copyright owners and the rights of the users of copyrighted material. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act dramatically tilted the copyright balance toward complete copyright protection at the expense of the public’s right to fair use.”

But the RIAA said the bill would effectively repeal the DMCA. The bill would “allow electronics companies to induce others to break the law for their own profit,” it said in a statement. Advances such digital music sales, online games, on-demand movies and e-books can be traced to DMCA protects, the RIAA said. Source: RIAA opposes new fair use bill

Screw the RIAA, these people are going away and they know it, it is easier and easier for artists to create and distribute their own music and other media, it’s just too bad most of it sucks, but, most of the music coming out of those music companies sucks as well. This bill would also limit the statutory damages against individuals and firms who may be found to have engaged in contributory infringement, inducement of infringement, or other indirect infringement.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - February 28, 2007 at 11:12 pm

Categories: Piracy   Tags: , , ,

Top 25 Universities in Piracy

Using new software tools the RIAA has released a new top 25 list for Universities around the nation, the top 25 in Piracy. According to the RIAA, they have sent out over 14,500 infringement notices during the 2006-2007 school year, nearly triple the number sent during the previous year. But, this could be because of the better tools, and not because three times as many people are downloading music. Now, this list is just notices sent, they aren’t measuring exactly how many songs are being downloaded, etc, just the total number of infringement notices they have sent to the Universities.

Purdue, on the other hand (my not-so-proud alma mater for today), seems to be taking the “don’t worry, be happy” approach to sitting pretty at the number two spot. The school almost never even notifies the students of copyright infringement, or much of anything, in my experience. Purdue spokesman Steve Tally told the Associated Press, “In a sense, the (complaint) letter is asking us to pursue an investigation and as the service provider we don’t see that as our role.” This attitude expresses either extreme pompousness on Purdue’s part or extreme ignorance. Is that not the whole reason why the RIAA cannot pursue potential infringers individually? The students are currently allowed to hide behind the ISP in this case, the university with the understanding that the ISP will investigate infringement accusations. If Purdue and any other schools who express this attitude don’t feel the need to investigate, then they put themselves at risk of being sued by the RIAA.

Without further ado, the list:

Ohio University – 1,287
Purdue University – 1,068
University of Nebraska at Lincoln – 1,002
University of Tennessee at Knoxville – 959
University of South Carolina – 914
University of Massachusetts at Amherst – 897
Michigan State University – 753
Howard University – 572
North Carolina State University – 550
University of Wisconsin at Madison – 513
University of South Florida – 490
Syracuse University – 488
Northern Illinois University – 487
University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire – 473
Boston University – 470
Northern Michigan University – 457
Kent State University – 424
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor – 400
University of Texas at Austin – 371
North Dakota State University – 360
Indiana University – 353
Western Kentucky University – 353
Seton Hall University – 338
Arizona State University – 336
Marshall University – 331 Source: Forget party schools: The RIAA lists the top piracy schools in the US

It’s good to see one of our local universities in the top 25 again, but this is the wrong list to be on. If ANY of these Universities would like to talk about hardware that can easily detect and block file sharing programs, email me at webmaster at tipsdr.com and I can put you in contact with a vendor who will let you try one of their devices out. This device will stop it without any latency because it does not go inline with your routers, it just needs to see all of the traffic through a span port on your switch to be able to block it.

Under federal law, universities that receive complaints about students illegally distributing copyrighted songs generally must act to stop repeat offenders or else the schools can be sued. The entertainment industry typically can identify a student only by his or her numerical Internet address and must rely on the school to correlate that information with its own records to trace a person’s identity. Source: Music industry cracks down on colleges

This makes Purdue’s stand seem ill advised, as they do not normally notify offenders that have received a complaint from the RIAA, they say it is too much trouble to find them. They also say, our students aren’t repeat offenders, I wonder how they know that, but they don’t know which users are doing it. Curious. Maybe all of the students there just know better after their first download and stop doing it, but, wouldn’t that mean they would stop receiving complaints as well? I would like to hear more from them on how it is too much trouble to track, but they know their students are not repeat offenders.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - February 23, 2007 at 4:19 pm

Categories: Piracy   Tags: ,

Internet Security Threat Report and How to Avoid Most Threats

Symantec has released the latest copy of their Internet Security Threat Report, and, not surprisingly, the nature of the threats are becoming more economical in nature. As more and more criminal activity moves to the web, it will just keep getting worse and worse, it’s too easy for people to take advantage of other people in today’s internet, I can make a fake email right now for paypal and spam it around the internet and probably have people’s login details the first day, and I’ve never, ever done anything like that before, that’s how easy it is. It’s way to easy to fashion a piece of spyware as well, distribute it through security holes and other bad websites across the web and be knocking down great money in no time.

The Symantec Internet Security Threat Report offers analysis and discussion of threat activity over a six-month period. It covers Internet attacks, vulnerabilities, malicious code, and future trends. The latest report, released March 7, is now available.

This volume of the Internet Security Threat Report offers an overview of threat activity that took place between July 1 and December 31, 2005. In this edition, the new threat landscape is shown to be increasingly dominated by attacks and malicious code that are used to commit cyber crime, criminal acts that incorporate a computer or Internet component. Attackers have moved away from large, multipurpose attacks on network perimeters and toward smaller, more focused attacks on client-side targets.

The threat landscape is coming to be dominated by emerging threats such as bot networks and customizable modular malicious code. Targeted attacks on Web applications and Web browsers are increasingly becoming the focal point for cyber criminals. Whereas traditional attack activity has been motivated by curiosity and a desire to show off technical virtuosity, many current threats are motivated by profit. They often attempt to perpetrate criminal acts, such as identity theft, extortion, and fraud, for financial gain.

Over the last six months of 2005, Symantec detected an average of 1,402 Denial of Service (DoS) attacks per day. This is an increase of 51 percent from the first half of 2005, when Symantec detected an average of 927 DoS attacks per day. Source: Symantec.

I wish I could teach everyone how to use the internet in one big session, but I’ll try to do as many here as I can.

1) Never, ever click on any links in your emails, like the ones you get from eBay and paypal, etc, always type it in the address bar in internet explorer or fire fox, or whatever browser you are using. It’s way to easy to make a fake email that looks like it came from paypal, you click on a link and try to login to a website that looks like paypal, and they have your paypal info right then and can start spending your money immediately.

2) You can see exactly where a link goes on any webpage, all you have to do is hold down the mouse button when you click on a link, and you can see where the link goes in the bottom of internet explorer, if you want to go there, simply release the button, if you don’t, keep the button held down and slide your mouse away from the link, and it will not cause the click to happen.

3) Nothing is free on the internet, it will cost you in some way. Most, not all, but most, free screensaver sites load some form of adware or spyware if it doesn’t cost you anything to purchase it. A lot of game sites, and celebrity sites will do the same thing, as they have to pay for all the bandwidth they are using.

4) When installing software, there is always a license agreement, read it. I know, I know, no one reads these things, but at least scan through them as they are supposed to list in it if they install any other software.

5) Do NOT forward anything that says forward to everyone or ten people or whatever. None of it works, none of it is true, it’s sole reason for existing is to waste bandwidth, and that is exactly what happens when you forward this latest email to everyone you know.

6) When posting on forums or wherever, do a search while you are there first, if it is a common question, the answers will already be there and no one will be calling you noob or newbie and telling you to search for the answer first.

7) Don’t believe everything you read, even the big news sites get things wrong some days, although they are usually the most trustworthy, just like this site. ;)

8) If you like a site, support it by buying stuff through their links, or donating if they have a donate button. It does cost money to run a website, and the more popular it is, the more expensive it is.

9) Always have an anti virus program and an anti spyware program, the ones I like are Panda for anti virus, that link is for their free online scan, and X-Cleaner for anti spyware.

10) If you use a peer to peer network to get music, movies, whatever, you will end up with loads of spyware and you may get caught and possibly fined by the RIAA, or whoever is trying to stop the file sharing now. You have been warned.

Of course, these are for newbie?s and non technical people, if you know anything about computers, then you probably already know these.

Symantec’s latest Internet Security Threat Report, to be issued on March 7, 2006, analyzes data collected from over 24,000 security devices deployed in over 180 countries. It covers the six-month period from July 1 ? December 31, 2005 and includes analysis of network-based attacks, a review of known vulnerabilities, highlights of Adware, Spyware, and malicious code, an analysis of Spam and Phishing data and a forward looking analysis in Future Watch.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - March 9, 2006 at 12:10 pm

Categories: Reviews, Spyware Info, Tech News, Virus Info   Tags: , , , , , , ,

More Music Fallout

News.com is reporting that some popular peer to peer file sharing sites are shutting down do to pressure from the RIAA. They reported that Bearshare, eDonkey and WinMX were some of the targets, but it seems that WinMX is the only one down, as eDonkey and Bearshare are still up. They did report that an office in New York of eDonkey had been closed, they also reported no one from any of the networks could be contacted. Like they really want to answer the tough questions from news.com about file swapping and it’s legalities.

The decentralized nature of most peer-to-peer file-sharing software makes it uncontrollable once it is released over the Internet. However, shutting off sites where users first download the software may strangle the flow of new users.

“There’s certainly a big realignment of networks going on after the RIAA letters. Everyone is going to see a fallout since the ruling is making it tough for these companies to exist,” said Marc Morgenstern, vice president for Loudeye, during the Digital Hollywood conference in Santa Monica.

Other Articles:
The Supreme Court has handed movie studios and record labels a sweeping victory against file swapping, ruling that peer-to-peer companies such as Grokster could be held responsible for the copyright piracy on their networks.

The Recording Industry Association of America has sent letters to seven peer-to-peer companies, asking them to halt what the RIAA alleges is their practice of encouraging users to illegally distribute copyrighted material.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - September 22, 2005 at 9:22 am

Categories: Tech News   Tags: , ,