Posts Tagged ‘Google Maps’

Google Launches Earth and Maps Blog, Talk Geoweb

Google has created another blog, this time for Google Earth and Google Maps, called Google Lat Long Blog, and they are talking about the Geoweb.

So… what is the “geoweb”? Some people will scratch their heads and call it buzzword proliferation. Others, including Mike Liebhold, who has a long history of thinking and writing about this area, have a very well defined notion of what they believe it is (or should be). I don’t think that there is agreement on what the geoweb is, but I think there is a lot of enthusiasm and energy across many fronts to make it happen. I expect the “it” will evolve substantially over the next few months and years as we (the geo ecosystem on the web) collectively figure out how “earth browsers,” embedded maps, local search, geo-tagged photos, blogs, the traditional GIS world, wikis, and other user-generated geo content all interrelate. Those of us who work on geo products and services at Google believe we have an opportunity to make the web more useful — and ultimately, to improve people’s lives through better information and understanding. Source: A new world unfolding

One searcher at a time…

A new feature called geo search, gives users the ability to search all kinds of geographical information and makes it possible for people to discover these maps through normal “local” searches simply by clicking on the “see user-created content” link. Looks pretty cool.

A company from California has created software that will allow creators, etc, to layer sounds in Google Earth. The firm is already in talks with Google, smart, but no official agreement has been made.

As well as homing in on visual feasts around the globe, users of Google Earth may soon be able to listen to the sounds that accompany them.
A Californian company has created software that can layer relevant recorded sounds over locations in Google Earth, New Scientist reports. Source: Sounds bring Google Earth to life

An example of a use they mentioned was people are talking about selective logging and how is was a good way of not harming the environment, but, even though the images are the same, the sounds coming from the natural world is completely different.

Be sure to check out the Google Earth Layers, Google Pack from which you can download Google Earth, click this link, Google Earth Search to search for everything relating to Google Earth and click this link to download Google Earth here

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - May 10, 2007 at 5:58 pm

Categories: Google   Tags: , , , , , ,

Google Updates New Orleans Satellite Imagery

Google updated the satellite imagery associated with the Gulf Coast region Sunday because of complaints from politicians that they were airbrushing history by not showing the region’s post Katrina images. Boy, you would think our government could find something more to be concerned about that whether the satellite images that Google is showing on Google Earth or Google Maps are up to date or not.

A related article run by the Associated Press at the tail end of last week outlined the geographic changes implemented to the popular map engine. This then subsequently led to a U.S. House Subcommittee pointing accusatory fingers at Google with regard to “airbrushing history” for the sake of relaying a conveniently untouched depiction of New Orleans, Louisiana, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Source: Google?s wrist slapped for ?airbrushing history?

Google addressed this on their blog with the following statements,

In 2005, shortly after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, a very motivated group of volunteers at Google worked with NOAA, NASA, and others to post updated imagery of the affected areas in Google Maps and Google Earth as quickly as possible. This data served as a useful reference for many people — from those interested in understanding what had happened, to friends and families checking on the status of loved ones and property, to rescuers and relief workers. Shortly after the event, we received a voicemail thanking us for the role Google Earth played in guiding rescuers to stranded victims.

Several months later, in September 2006, the storm imagery was replaced with pre-Katrina aerial photography of much higher resolution as part of a regular series of global data enhancements. We continued to make available the Katrina imagery, and associated overlays such as damage assessments and Red Cross shelters, on a dedicated site (earth.google.com/katrina.html). Our goal throughout has been to produce a global earth database of the best quality — accounting for timeliness, resolution, cloud cover, light conditions, and color balancing. Source: About the New Orleans imagery in Google Maps and Earth

Google Earth is a great program, but I fail to see the need for politicians to get involved in whether Google is showing the latest images or not. One would think they would be more worried about updating the images provided by the US Geological Survey. Download the latest version of Google Earth by clicking on this link,

1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - April 3, 2007 at 2:02 pm

Categories: Google   Tags: , , ,

Google Maps Close Up

Google Maps picture
This is pretty cool right here, I’ve never been able to get so close to the earth using Google Earth, but apparently, using Google Maps, you can zoom in pretty close in some areas. That one guy actually looks like he is looking at the satellite. Via Shawn Hogan. Click this link to download Google Earth,

Look at it in Google Maps here for a REALLY detailed image from space.

Of course we’ll probably find out that Google uses images from planes as well.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - March 27, 2007 at 7:32 pm

Categories: Google   Tags: , ,

Google Maps API adds KML and GeoRSS Support

Google Maps has added some cool new formats to their API, KML and GeoRSS. Currently, they support points, lines, polygons, styles, icons, and network links (without view-based refresh) in the KML files, and they will be adding ground overlays, screen overlays, folders, and visibility soon. More information can be found in the Google Maps API documentation. So now you can create a KML file using Google Earth and load it up in Google Maps, so you can see exactly where they are.

To start we now support GeoRSS as a data format for geographic content in Google Maps. We want to enable users to create data in whatever format is most convenient for them, and feel that by supporting both KML and GeoRSS we can enable a wider variety of people and applications to contribute content to Google Maps. We’ve built support for the Simple, GML, and W3C Geo encodings of GeoRSS — all you have to do is enter the full URL of a GeoRSS file into the Maps query box to load the file. For example, take a look at SlashGeo’s GeoRSS on Google Maps.

Most importantly, we’ve extended support for displaying geographic data — both KML and GeoRSS — into the Google Maps API. Now in addition to programatically adding content to a Maps API site, you can create your content as KML or GeoRSS and load it into the Map with a simple function call. This means that the more than 1 million KML files that are available from all over the web can easily be mashed up with the map on your site. For example, you can add some vacation photos from Japan with the following code:

var gx = new GGeoXml(“http://kml.lover.googlepages.com/my-vacation-photos.kml”);
map.addOverlay(gx);

This makes it easier for API sites to maintain content in a flexible format that can be accessed via the API or in a number of other tools directly, and makes it simpler to create a rich API site with declarative content, instead of a lot of code. Source: KML and GeoRSS Support Added to the Google Maps API

The O’reilly Radar site, says this will help KML become an OGC standard, and they expect Google to soon accept GeoRSS as a layer, and that they will probably start showing up in Google Earth’s web search.

Additionally, KML is on its way to becoming an OGC standard (and as you can see from this Slashgeo poll it’s a popular idea). It’s great for them to begin accepting this other OGC standard as they begin that process.

I expect this means that GeoRSS will be accepted as a Google Earth layer soon and that GeoRSS will start showing up in Google Earth’s Web Search. This would provide even further incentive content sites to join the likes of Flickr (as an aside compare with Flickr’s map feature with a Google Map consuming the same feed – I think Flickr’s is cleaner, but it does not have Google’s flexibility) and Upcoming by exporting in GeoRSS (as if today’s announcement wasn’t enough). WordPress bloggers can start using the GeoPress plugin (Radar post) right away (I already do on the Ignite Seattle blog — it’s very easy to use). Source: Google is Supporting GeoRSS

Lots of stuff coming out for Google Earth lately, be sure to check some of the other articles below.

2 comments - What do you think?  Posted by Jimmy Daniels - March 23, 2007 at 9:14 pm

Categories: Google   Tags: , , , ,