Todays Tech 5/31/2007

Hitting some of the technology highlights.

Data Recovery Using Linux Recovering data from a Windows system using Linux tools.

Well we really screwed this one up? In trying to remove some Live Journals that were violating their terms, specifically pedophile journals and communities, they deleted some that should not have been deleted and are trying to explain what happened and what they are doing to get them back. Related article from News.com here.

Can you say du huh. Studies: music industry overstating threat of P2P piracy Unauthorized sharing of digital music remains a huge issue for the global music business, but is most of that sharing taking place on peer-to-peer networks? For years, peer-to-peer was the bogeyman, the red Communist music monster than was going to devour the industry’s revenues. But new research suggests that sneakernets may be as big a problem as darknets.

EMI Music, Google and YouTube strike milestone partnership Soon, you will be watching videos and recordings from EMI Music artists, through a deal between EMI and Google.

Mahalo Is Hawaiian for Useless Unbiased review of Mahalo, the hand made search engine from Jason Calacanis. Michael Arrington writes a puff piece here.

BBC to broadcast in ‘Second Life’ In the Second Life economy, more than $600,000 changes hands every day. Now the virtual world is about to play host to a BBC show about that economy and how people have made real money from it.

A picture’s worth a thousand clicks Google has bought Panoramio, a community photos website that enables digital photographers to geo-locate, store and organize their photographs — and to view those photographs in Google Earth. Big surprise huh?

Google brings developers offline with ?Gears?; new offline Reader ?Google Gears,? an open source project that will bring offline capabilities to Web Applications ? aimed at developers. From the Gears API Blog Gears is a browser extension that we hope — with time and plenty of input and collaboration from outside of Google — can make not just our applications but everyone’s applications work offline. From Read/Write Web And guess who is most at risk with this announcement? Yes, Microsoft. Google after all has many of the top ‘best of breed’ web apps now, and Mozilla wants more market share against Microsoft’s Internet Explorer browser. Adobe and Microsoft are also engaged in an ongoing battle for Rich Internet App supremacy, which probably explains why Adobe is involved in Gears. And of course, this will have major implications for the Web Office – where Google Apps is directly competing against Microsoft Office (whether Google admits it or not!).